Guru Yoga Practice – Gnostic Approach

Not long ago I had a chance to read a book that was about an esoteric practice, as seen in the context of Tibetan Buddhism. One of the practices that was mentioned in this book is called Guru Yoga. It is a type of meditative practice that entails bringing in a high ideal and putting it in front of you. I heard about Guru Yoga term even before that, but in the context of invoking a spiritual teacher.

Being inspired by the description of the practice, I decided to do it but from the Gnostic approach and to see how it would affect me. Because the results were good, I decided to share here how the practice goes.

In Hinduism “guru” is a term that signifies “teacher”. It is most often referred to a physical teacher who is transmitting some kind of spiritual teachings. However, on a deeper level, in Hindi faith they say that any life-form can be a teacher, be it a plant, a rock, a mountain, a bird, a friend, a flowing water, a child, a stranger, or anyone else for that matter. Guru can also be some high principles of divinity, such as the three Logos – Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva. From the Gnostic perspective, a guru is also ones own Being (Higher Self), and based on this precise perspective I modified the practice that I’ve read in the abovementioned book. Continue reading

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Spiritual Ways to Dealing With Worry

To worry is a common thing within the human being. We worry so much, almost all the time. Worry can be related to everything in life, but it tends to be strongest when it comes to things that are related to ones own survival. We constantly worry about so many things. For example, what others think of us occupy a strong place in the mind, and it is a worry directly related to pride. All of the worries have their roots in one ego (subconscious inner state, a defect) or another. Worry itself is an inner state/defect that pops up and manifest as an emotion, thought, or an impulse, and sadly often time it can consume the human being.

The best way to deal with it would be as with any other defect – observing it from the state of detachment. Once the defect is observed in that way, we gain an understanding of it, and can then eliminate it. This would be an ideal way to do it, a way also known as the First Key of the Path to Awakening. However, for those who are not yet ready for such technique, there are alternatives that could work.

Not long ago I’ve read a book by Annie Besant, a famous Theosophist. In it she says how a worry is a strong thought current, and if frequent enough, it digs for itself a channel by which it makes continuous impression on the mind of a person. She suggests that in order to counter it, a person should create a thought current and a channel of an opposite character. She says: Continue reading

Exercise of Retrospection – A Powerful Tool That Can Change Your Life

An exercise of retrospection is a powerful tool. With it we gain self-knowledge, insights, and understanding about our behavior and subconscious defects or egos (things such as anger, fear, pride, lust etc.) that have manifested during the day but have gone unnoticed, and as they go unseen they are controlling our lives. As it is said, ‘Life is a series of events’. The flow of the day sets out various events that we go through, most of which bring about egos within us, regardless if we notice them or not. Sometimes we go through difficult or intense situations, a chaotic development of events where it is very hard to be in the present moment and detached from our egos. These types of events can easily pull us in and drag us along, which means that we act unconsciously. Even if the flow of events is ordinary, there are still emotions, thoughts, and/or impulses that manifest within us.

From an outburst of anger, to a subtle surging of envy, in the retrospective exercise we can see all of that and get knowledge about the egotistic state (ego) and how it controls us. This then can change our lives, simply because, in the exercise of retrospection, we are looking at the events from the perspective of the observer, rather than the participant. Continue reading