Guru Yoga Practice – Gnostic Approach

Not long ago I had a chance to read a book that was about an esoteric practice, as seen in the context of Tibetan Buddhism. One of the practices that was mentioned in this book is called Guru Yoga. It is a type of meditative practice that entails bringing in a high ideal and putting it in front of you. I heard about Guru Yoga term even before that, but in the context of invoking a spiritual teacher.

Being inspired by the description of the practice, I decided to do it but from the Gnostic approach and to see how it would affect me. Because the results were good, I decided to share here how the practice goes.

In Hinduism “guru” is a term that signifies “teacher”. It is most often referred to a physical teacher who is transmitting some kind of spiritual teachings. However, on a deeper level, in Hindi faith they say that any life-form can be a teacher, be it a plant, a rock, a mountain, a bird, a friend, a flowing water, a child, a stranger, or anyone else for that matter. Guru can also be some high principles of divinity, such as the three Logos – Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva. From the Gnostic perspective, a guru is also ones own Being (Higher Self), and based on this precise perspective I modified the practice that I’ve read in the abovementioned book. Continue reading

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Reflection: To Be Given Another Chance

In one of his online talks about spirituality and the inner Work, Mark Pritchard (Belsebuub), mentioned a specific scenario that, I believe, has put many people to thought. The recurring theme was the importance of the inner work in the context of this life that we have on this planet, how valuable such existence is, and how precious is our time here. He mentioned the hypothetical situation of imagining ourselves at the end of our life reflecting back. The following meditation is inspired by what he said.

Imagine that you are 85 years of age, lying on your deathbed. You don’t have much more to go, but enough time to reflect on your life. You see how things went, the ups and downs. You see yourself at one point of your life doing the inner work. Perhaps the memory of happiness and joy overwhelms you, the happiness that you had when you were living a spiritual life and when you were walking towards your Being. You then see yourself getting pressured by life, perhaps by some strong emotions of excitement, of pleasure, of the mundane flow of life that swept away the innocent joy that you have previously found in the Inner work. And little by little, you lost an interest in that which previously uplifted your soul. Continue reading

Everything passes

plant-and-sun

If we do not make an effort, how can we change? The most important thing is not to identify ourselves with external circumstances. Life is like a movie that in fact has a beginning and an end. Different scenes are constantly passing through the screen of the mind. The most serious error within us is to identify ourselves with these scenes. Why? Simply because they pass. They are just scenes of a great movie and in the end they always pass. ~ Samael Aun Weor

Not long ago I have read a transcript of a talk of Samael Aun Weor in which he, among other things, writes about the passing of things in this world. Even though I already have a certain undertanding of how we shouldn’t react to things when we find ourselves in situations that seems endless, I was still touched by his childhood story:

“Our father forbade us from visiting our earthly mother. Nevertheless we were not so ungrateful as to forget her. I used to always escape from my house with a younger brother who would always follow me. We would go for a short visit, then return back home, but my little brother suffered a lot because when we returned he would be very tired and I would have to carry him on my back. While crying he said, ‘when we get home Dad is going to whip us.’ I would say back, ‘Why do you cry? Remember that everything passes.’ Continue reading